Image from page 246 of “The naturalist’s library : containing scientific and popular descriptions of man, quadrupeds, birds, fishes, reptiles and insects” (1852)

Image from page 246 of “The naturalist’s library : containing scientific and popular descriptions of man, quadrupeds, birds, fishes, reptiles and insects” (1852)
smart contract
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: naturalistslibra00gould
Title: The naturalist’s library : containing scientific and popular descriptions of man, quadrupeds, birds, fishes, reptiles and insects
Year: 1852 (1850s)
Authors: Gould, Augustus A. (Augustus Addison), 1805-1866 Dwight, Jonathan, 1858-1929, former owner. DSI Tucker, Marcia Brady, former owner. DSI Myers, C., former owner. DSI
Subjects: Zoology
Publisher: Boston : Phillips, Sampson, and Company
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ilities are renewed in the same manner; nor do theysuspend their havoc till the majority are destroyed. For this reason it is,that, after any place has for a long while been infested with rats, they oftenseem to disappear of a sudden, and sometimes for a considerable time. The female always prepares a bed for her young, and provides themimmediately with food. On their first quitting the-hole, she watches over,defends, and will even fight the cots, in order to save them. The weasel,though a smaller animal, is, however, a still more formidable enemy thanthe cat. The rat cannot inflict any wounds but by snatches, and with hisfore teeth, which, however, being rather calculated for gnawing than forbiting, have but little strength; whereas the weasel bites fiercely with theforce of its whole jaw at once, and, instead of letting go its hold, sucks theblood through the wound. In every conflict with an enemy so dangerous,it is-no wonder, therefore, that the rat should fall a victim. IHE MOUSEi

Text Appearing After Image:
Is an animal smaller than the rat, as also more numerous, and more gene-rally difiused. Its instinct, its temperament, its disposition is the same;nor does it materially difier from the rat, but by its weakness, and the habitswhich it contracts from that circumstance. By nature timid, by necessityfamiliar, its fears and its wants are the sole springs of its actions. It neverleaves its hiding-place, but to seek for food; nor does Jt, like the rat, gofrom one house to another, unless forced to it, or commit by any means somuch mischief. When viewed without the absiird disgust and apprehensionwhich usually accompanies, or is afiected at the sight of it, the mouse is abeautiful creature ; its skin is sleek and soft, its eyes bright and lively, allits limbs are formed with exquisite delicacy, and its motions are smart andactive. Though one of the most timid of creatures, the mouse may betaught to repose confidence in mankind, and will quit its place of refuge toreceive food. Some few of th

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *